Wharton County's Credit Union
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Recent Fraud Alerts

FRAUDULENT CALLS ABOUT DEBIT CARDS REPORTEDLY FROM NCUA

The National Credit Union Administration today warned consumers to beware of a new telephone
fraud, known as a “vishing” scheme, that is using the agency’s name in an attempt to obtain
personal financial information.  Calls seem to be coming marked as
Number 1001.  Do not answer
this call.

Several credit union members have been contacted by an automated phone call claiming to be from
NCUA and notifying consumers their debit cards have been compromised. The call then asks the
receiver to follow prompts, which request personal information, including sensitive financial data
and personal identification information.

Anyone contacted by this so-called “vishing” scheme should immediately contact NCUA’s
Consumer Assistance Center Hotline at 800-755-1030 or by email at phishing@ncua.gov to report
the scam. Operators answer calls Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Eastern.


FRAUDULENT TEXASGULF FCU PHONE CALLS REGARDING DEBIT CARDS.

     DO NOT ANSWER CALLS FROM THIS NUMBER: 619-272-1197
                                                                    OR
                            FROM THIS NUMBER: 407-730-2941

THERE ARE DIFFERENT CALLS GOING OUT TO OUR MEMBERS REGARDING THEIR DEBIT
CARDS.  WE DO NOT MAKE ANY CALLS REGARDING YOUR DEBIT CARD, ESPECIALLY ASKING
YOU TO ENTER YOUR CARD NUMBER.  WE ALREADY HAVE IT.  IF YOU GET A CALL ABOUT
YOUR DEBIT CARD, HANG UP.  

 DO NOT ENTER YOUR DEBIT CARD NUMBER OR SECURITY CODE FROM THE BACK!

IF YOU HAVE GIVEN OUT YOUR ENTIRE DEBIT CARD NUMBER, EXPIRATION DATE, AND
SECURITY CODE (3-DIGIT CODE ON THE BACK), PLEASE CONTACT US IMMEDIATELY!  YOUR
DEBIT CARD WILL HAVE TO BE CANCELLED AND A NEW ONE ORDERED.

CALL US AT (979) 282-2300 IN WHARTON, (979) 578-9000 IN EL CAMPO, OR 1-800-647-8428.


Widespread "Robo-Calling" Scam That Now Includes Text Messages to Cell Phones - 2/14/2012

Listen to a recording of the robo-call (MP3)   
Listen to a recording of the robo-text phone call (MP3)   

NCUA (National Credit Union Administration) is again warning consumers about reports of a "robo-
calling" scam that is seeking to gain access to consumers' banking and social security information.
The reported scam now includes text messages to consumers' cell phones.

To date, more than 300 complaints have been reported about this scam. In at least ten cases so far,
consumers reported giving out their personal information.

This scam has not slowed down or stopped, and now includes text messages to consumers' cell
phones that attempt to steal personal information.  Texasgulf FCU is warning people not to provide
any personal banking information based on an automated phone call or text message.
An example of a script of a typical call is as follows: "This is a call from NAME Bank/Credit Union.
Your MasterCard® account has been locked. Please press 1 now to unlock." The recording then
instructs the individual to enter his or her card number in order to activate it. The AG's office has
gained access to a recording of those calls and is urging the public to listen to the call in order to
avoid being a victim of identity theft. The recording of that call can be heard
here .

A similar text message asks consumers to call a number to unlock their debit card. A typical
message states: "Dear NAME Bank/Credit Union customer, your account is locked. Toll free 1-(888)
317-3670." That number connects to a recording which also instructs the individual to enter his or
her debit card number in order to activate it. The recording which can be heard
here.

Based on information and complaints received from consumers and area banks and credit unions,
it is believed that the robo-calling scam began in early September. Bank customers, non-
customers, and employees have received automated robo-calls typically between the hours of 11 p.
m. and 6 a.m. These calls have frequently contacted consumers on their cell phones.

Originating numbers for these phone calls include, but are not limited to:
    •        (508) 475-1394
    •        (214) 232-0615
    •        1262 (just a four digit number)
    •        Many calls are from Unknown, Restricted, or Private numbers

Those who receive this robo-call or text message may wish to contact the Federal Trade
Commission (FTC) at 1-877-FTC-HELP (382-4357) or through the internet at
www.ftc.gov. This
federal agency has oversight of deceptive telephone solicitations and will be able to record your
complaint.

If consumers believe they may already be a victim of identity theft and have provided personal
banking information or other personal information (e.g., Social Security number, credit card number)
over the phone, you should immediate do the following:

1. Call one of the three major credit bureaus and place a one-call fraud alert on your credit report:
•   Equifax: Call (800) 525-6285, www.equifax.com, or write: P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241.
•   Experian: Call (888) 397-3742,
www.experian.com, or write: P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013.
•   TransUnion: Call (800) 680-7289,
www.transunion.com, or write: Fraud Victim Assistance Division
                                                                                                          P.O. Box 6790
                                                                                                          Fullerton, CA 92834-6790.

You only need to call one of the three credit bureaus; the one you contact is required by law to
contact the other two credit bureaus. This one-call fraud alert will remain in your credit file for at least
90 days. The fraud alert requires creditors to contact you before opening any new accounts or
increasing credit limits on your existing accounts. When you place a fraud alert on your credit report,
you are entitled to order one free credit report from each of the three nationwide consumer reporting
agencies.

2. Immediately examine your bank account for any suspicious activity. Whether you bank online or
receive your statement in the mail, you may want to go over your statements with a fine toothed
comb to ensure that there is nothing out of the ordinary on them. Report any irregularities to your
financial institution.

3. Contact the fraud departments of your credit card issuers or bank. These financial institutions can
monitor your account for suspicious activity. You may also wish to cancel these accounts; you can
discuss this option with your credit card company or bank.

4. Order a copy of your credit report, and look for unauthorized activity. Look carefully for unexplained
activity on your credit report
.
5. If there is unexplained activity on your credit report, you may want to place an extended fraud alert
on your credit report. If after reviewing your credit report you believe there is unexplained activity, you
may want to place an extended fraud alert on your credit report. In order to do this, you need to file a
police report with your local police department, keep a copy for yourself, and provide a copy to one of
the three major credit bureaus. Then an extended fraud alert can be placed on your credit file for a 7-
year period. This will mean that any time a user of your credit report (for instance, a credit company
of lender) checks your credit report, it will be notified that you do not authorize any new credit cards,
any increase in credit limits, the issuance of a new card on an existing account, or other increases
in credit, unless the user takes extra precautions to ensure that it is giving the additional credit to
you (and not to an identity thief).


SMISHING - 7/21/2011
Details:  In the last few days, credit union members are receiving bogus text message (smishing)
alerts. The text message indicates it is from Credit Union Services and advises the member to call
the number provided in the text message to have their card reactivated.

This is a scam as no credit union would ever ask a member for this type of information using text
messaging.  There have been multiple phone numbers provided in text messages sent to credit
union members to call to have their card reactivated. One credit union reported that some of their
members responded to the text and provided the requested card information.

Texasgulf FCU or any partner vendor will never send you a text, voice or email message and ask you
for your card or account number.  If you do give out your card or account information, please notify us
immediately.


JURY DUTY SCAM
The phone rings, you pick it up, and the caller identifies himself as an officer of the court. He says
you failed to report for jury duty and that a warrant is out for your arrest. You say you never received a
notice. To clear it up, the caller says he'll need some information for "verification purposes"-your
birth date, social security number, maybe even a credit card number.

This is when you should hang up the phone. It's a scam.

Jury scams have been around for years, but have seen a resurgence in recent months.
Communities in more than a dozen states have issued public warnings about cold calls from
people claiming to be court officials seeking personal information. As a rule, court officers never ask
for confidential information over the phone; they generally correspond with prospective jurors via
mail.

The scam's bold simplicity may be what makes it so effective. Facing the unexpected threat of
arrest, victims are caught off guard and may be quick to part with some information to defuse the
situation.

"They get you scared first," says a special agent in the Minneapolis field office who has heard the
complaints. "They get people saying, 'Oh my gosh! I'm not a criminal. What's going on?'" That's
when the scammer dangles a solution-a fine, payable by credit card that will clear up the problem.  
With enough information, scammers can assume your identity and empty your bank accounts.  "It
seems like a very simple scam," the agent adds. The trick is putting people on the defensive, and
then reeling them back in with the promise of a clean slate. "It's kind of ingenious. It's social
engineering."

In recent months, communities in Florida, New York, Minnesota, Illinois, Colorado, Oregon,
California, Virginia, Oklahoma, Arizona, and New Hampshire reported scams or posted warnings or
press releases on their local websites. In August, the federal court system issued a warning on the
scam and urged people to call their local District Court office if they receive suspicious calls. In
September, the FBI issued a press release about jury scams and suggested victims also contact
their local FBI field office.

In March, USA.gov, the federal government’s information website, posted details about jury scams
in their Frequently Asked Questions area. The site reported scores of queries on the subject from
website visitors and callers seeking information
.
The jury scam is a simple variation of the identity-theft ploys that have proliferated in recent years as
personal information and good credit have become thieves' preferred prey, particularly on the
Internet. Scammers might tap your information to make a purchase on your credit card, but could
just as easily sell your information to the highest bidder on the Internet's black market.

Protecting yourself is the key: Never give out personal information when you receive an unsolicited
phone call.
Texasgulf FCU will try to
keep you up to date on the
most recent fraud alerts.

The best defense against
fraud is common sense.

Never verify your account,
debit or credit card
information, social
security number, and
anyother personal
identification over the
phone.

If it sounds too good to be
true, it usually is.
®2010 - 2014 Texasgulf FCU              2101 N. Fulton St.   Wharton, TX  77488                                                         1313 West Loop, El Campo, TX  77437
                                                                 (979) 282-2300                                    Toll Free (800) 647-8428                          (979) 578-9000